Breast Cancer Metastases Based on Molecular Subtypes at RSUD Dr. H. Abdul Moeloek Lampung

Authors

  • Nurmayeni Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Lampung, Bandar Lampung, Indonesia, Indonesia
  • Nurul Islamy Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Lampung, Bandar Lampung, Indonesia, Indonesia
  • Agustyas Tjiptaningrum Clinical Pathology Department, Faculty of Medicine, University of Lampung, Bandar Lampung, Indonesia, Indonesia
  • Bintang Abadi Siregar Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, University of Lampung/RSUD Dr. H. Abdul Moeloek Bandar Lampung, Indonesia, Indonesia
  • Aditya Kusumaningtyas Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, University of Lampung/RSUD Dr. H. Abdul Moeloek Bandar Lampung, Indonesia, Indonesia
  • Indri Windarti Fakultas Kedokteran Unila, Indonesia

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.36408/mhjcm.v10i3.904

Keywords:

breast cancer, molecular subtypes, metastases

Abstract

BACKGROUND:Breast cancer is the most common cancer in Indonesia and is a leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the country. Metastases are responsible for most deaths among breast cancer patients. Breast cancer is typically classified into four subtypes based on immunohistochemistry: luminal A, luminal B, HER2+, and TNBC.

OBJECTIVE:To determine the association between the metastatic pattern of breast cancer and their molecular subtypes at RSUD Dr. H. Abdul Moeloek Lampung.

METHOD:This study was an observational analytic study with a cross-sectional design. The sample comprised 81 individuals who had suffered from breast cancer and were recorded in the medical records section of RSUD Dr. H. Abdul Moeloek Lampung between 2013 – 2021 and met the inclusion and exclusion criteria. The association between breast cancer subtypes and the incidence and metastase sites were tested using the Chi-Square test.

RESULT:This study found a significant association between breast cancer subtypes and the incidence of metastases (p <0.05). The TNBC subtype had a more frequent rate of metastases (34.5%) than the other subtypes (31% luminal B, 20.7% luminal A, and HER2+ 13.8%). The study also revealed a relationship between ER status and the incidence of metastases (p < 0.05). The luminal A subtype tends to metastasize to the liver, luminal B tends to metastasize to the bone, HER2+ tends to metastasize to the lung and liver, and TNBC tends to metastasize to the lung. However, no significant association was found between breast cancer subtypes and metastatic sites.

CONCLUSION:There was a significant association between breast cancer subtypes and the incidence of metastases, but not with the metastatic sites.

 

Downloads

Download data is not yet available.

References

1. Sung H, Ferlay J, Siegel RL, Laversanne M, Soerjomataram I, Jemal DMV, et al. Global cancer statistics 2020: GLOBOCAN estimates of incidence and mortality worldwide for 36 cancers in 185 countries. CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians. 2021;71(3):209–49. doi:3322/caac.21660

2. Pangribowo S. 2019. Cancer Burden in Indonesia, Indonesian Ministry of Health Data and Information Center.

3. Ministry of Health of the Republic of Indonesia. 2022. Most Common Breast Cancer in Indonesia, Ministry of Health Targets Equalization of Health Services [Internet]. Available from:https://www.kemkes.go.id/article/view/22020400002/kanker-payudara-paling-besar-di-indonesia-kemenkes-targetkan-pemerataan- jasa-kesehatan.html

4. 2022. Metastatic Breast Cancer StatisticsNo Title. Metastatic Breast Cancer Research, Support and Awareness [Internet]. Available forms:https://www.metavivor.org/mbc-prep/metastatic-breast-cancer-statistics

5. American Cancer Society. 2019. Breast Cancer Facts & Figures 2019-2020, Atlanta: American Cancer Society.

6. Van Uden DJP, Van Maaren MC, Strobbe LJA, Bult P, Van Der Hoeven JJ, et al. Metastatic behavior and overall survival according to breast cancer subtypes in stage IV inflammatory breast cancer. Breast Cancer Res. 2019;21(1):1–9. doi:1186/s13058-019-1201-5

7. Chikarmane SA, Tirumani SH, Howard SA, Jagannathan JP, Dipiro PJ. Metastatic patterns of breast cancer subtypes: What radiologists should know in the era of personalized cancer medicine. Clin Radiol. 2015;70(1):1–10. doi:1016/j.crad.2014.08.015

8. Yang H, Wang R, Zeng F, Zhao J, Peng S, et al. Impact of molecular subtypes on metastatic behavior and overall survival in patients with metastatic breast cancer: A single-center study combined with a large cohort study based on the surveillance, epidemiology and end results database. Oncology Letters. 2020;20(4):1–3. doi:3892/ol.2020.11948

9. Helmi AF, Khambri D, Rustam R. The Relationship of Breast Cancer Subtypes with the Event of Metastasis in. Biosecientia Medicina: Journal of Biomedicine & Translational Research. 2021;1(1):399–405. doi:32539/bsm.v5i4.410

10. Akrami M, Tahmasebi S, Zangouri V, Hosseini S, Talei A. Metastatic Behavior of Breast Cancer Subtypes. Multidisciplinary Cancer Investigation. 2017;1(1):102. doi:21859/mci-supp-102

11. Gong Y, Liu YR, Ji P, Hu X, Shao ZM. Impact of molecular subtypes on metastatic breast cancer patients: A SEER population-based study. Sci Rep. 2017;7(2):1–10. doi:1038/srep45411

12. Wu Q, Li J, Zhu S, Wu J, Chen C, Liu Q, et al. Breast cancer subtypes predict the preferential site of distant metastases: A SEER based study. Oncotarget. 2017;8(17):90–6. doi:18632/oncotarget.15856

13. Tagliabue G, Fabiano S, Contiero P, Barigelleti G, Castelli M, Mazzoleni G, et al. Molecular subtypes, metastatic pattern and patient age in breast cancer: An analysis of Italian Network of Cancer Registries (AIRTUM) data. J Clin Med. 2021; 10(24):1-13. doi:3390/jcm10245873

14. Takaltar UV, Advani S. Prognostic indicators in breast cancer. Science Forecast. 2018;1(1):1–3.

15. Guo Y, Arciero CA, Jiang R, Behera M, Peng L, Li X. Different breast cancer subtypes show different metastatic patterns: A study from a large public database. Asian Pac J Cancer Prev. 2020; 21(12):3587-3593. doi:31557/APJCP.2020.21.12.3587.

16. Kast K, Link T, Friedrich K, Petzold A, Niedostatek A, Schoffer O, et al. Impact of breast cancer subtypes and patterns of metastasis on outcome. Breast Cancer Res Treat. 2015; 150(3):621-9. doi: 10.1007/s10549-015-3341-3

17. Jamnasi J, Gondhowiardjo S, Djoerban Z, Siregar NC, Poetiray EDC, Tunggono AP. Risk factors for distant metastasis in breast cancer patients. Indonesian Radiotherapy & Oncology. 2016;7(2):55–9. doi:32532/jori.v7i2.46

18. Anwar S, Avanti WS, Nugroho AC, Choridah L, Dwianingsih EK, Harahap WA, et al. Risk factors of distant metastasis after surgery among different breast cancer subtypes: A hospital-based study in Indonesia. World Journal of Surgical Oncology. 2020;18(1):1–16. doi:1186/s12957-020-01893-w

19. Perales GIU, Facio SKS, Dominiguea CNS, Huerta SC, Maldonado GEM, Flores PR, et al. Genetic alterations of triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) in women from northeastern Mexico. Oncol Lett. 2019; 17(3):3581-3588. doi:3892/ol.2019.9984

20. Pillai SKK, Tay A, Nair S, Leong CO. Triple negative breast cancer is associated with EGFR, CK5/6 and c-KIT expression in Malaysian women. BMC Clinic Pathol. 2012; 12(18):1-8. doi:1186/1472-6890-12-18

21. Yu T, Di G. Role of tumor microenvironment in triple-negative breast cancer and its prognostic significance. Chin J Cancer Res. 2017; 29(3):237-252. doi:21147/j.issn.1000-9604.2017.03.10

22. Wiguna N, Manuaba I. Characteristics of immunohistochemical examination in breast cancer patients at Sanglah General Hospital for the period 2003-2012. Udayana Medika E-Journal. 2014;3(7):1–13.

Additional Files

Published

2023-11-29

How to Cite

1.
Nurmayeni, Islamy N, Tjiptaningrum A, Siregar BA, Kusumaningtyas A, Windarti I. Breast Cancer Metastases Based on Molecular Subtypes at RSUD Dr. H. Abdul Moeloek Lampung. Medica Hospitalia J. Clin. Med. [Internet]. 2023 Nov. 29 [cited 2024 May 26];10(3):270-6. Available from: http://medicahospitalia.rskariadi.co.id/medicahospitalia/index.php/mh/article/view/904

Issue

Section

Original Article

Citation Check